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Bing and Google Suggest for Personal Reputation Management

Both Google and Bing have autosuggest, and it is a feature I think we tend to take for granted now. I know that I even cater my search terms when using either engine based on what comes up as a suggestion. It feels completely natural to do so, even though it is a relatively new feature. I barely remember a few years ago when you have to do the search and rely on a possible correction just in case you got it wrong.

For professionals and business owners, this feature offers something a little bit different. You can actually check these suggestions and use them to help direct your reputation management. You can even help to form what others think about your brand or yourself using the same methods. How useful is that?

When The Suggestions Are Bad

I have seen some pretty funny autosuggestions in the past. If you put “McDonalds is” into Google, the first three suggestions are “bad”, “gross” and “bad for you”. That is hardly a good view into the positives of the company, and I have seen much worst examples.

On the other hand, when you just put in “McDonalds” you get “menu”, “secret menu” and “dollar menu”. Which are much better and show that they have been able to mostly manage their reputation on the search engine. People are way more likely to see those suggestions than the first ones I cited.

If you have noticed that negative (or at least non-beneficial) search results are the first offered when you put in your brand name, you may have a problem. This can actually hurt traffic and the overall reputation of yourself or your company. That isn’t what anyone wants.

On the other hand, this information can open your eyes on some burning issues with your site usability (for example, people desparately searching [your business name + how to upgrade]).

Luckily SEOchat has an awesome tool for you to easily tap into all the Suggest results Google is showing for your brand in whatever combination: Google Suggest tool expand.

Google Suggest

The tool also supports Bing, Youtube and Amazon.

Fixing The Issue

The first thing you need to do is make sure you are not generating biased results. If you are signed into a Google account when you do the search, it is going to base things partially on any biased information you might have in past results or web browsing. Once you are signed out, or using incognito mode, you are ready to begin.

Doing the search should give you an idea of what it is you need to focus on. If you aren’t getting the direction to official sites, you should focus on spending more money for PPC in Google Adwords. If you are getting negative or insulting search suggests, you should focus on getting positive reviews and mentions on other people’s websites. Sites like BusinessProfiles.com and Cyfe may help getting additional listings.

The final influence for these suggestions are other people’s searches. But you have no real way to direct their search behavior, and trying would be pointless. Instead, focus on what you can easily control, like the three methods above.

What About Bing?

You might notice that I focused very much on Google in the information above. That is because working for the one – which is more extensive out of the two search engines – will inevitably have an effect on your results in Bing. You are basically going to need to take the same steps, so doing them for the more popular engine makes more sense.

Besides, Bing (sadly) has a long way to catch up with Google when it comes to google Suggest. Right now their results are very weak.

Have some tips on reputation management through autosuggest features on Google and Bing? Let us know in the comments.

Author information

Ann Smarty

Community Manager at Internet Marketing Ninjas

Ann Smarty is the pro blogger and guest blogger, social media enthusiast.

The post Bing and Google Suggest for Personal Reputation Management appeared first on SEO Chat.

Bing and Google Suggest for Personal Reputation Management

Both Google and Bing have autosuggest, and it is a feature I think we tend to take for granted now. I know that I even cater my search terms when using either engine based on what comes up as a suggestion. It feels completely natural to do so, even though it is a relatively new feature. I barely remember a few years ago when you have to do the search and rely on a possible correction just in case you got it wrong.

For professionals and business owners, this feature offers something a little bit different. You can actually check these suggestions and use them to help direct your reputation management. You can even help to form what others think about your brand or yourself using the same methods. How useful is that?

When The Suggestions Are Bad

I have seen some pretty funny auto-suggestions in the past. If you put “McDonalds is” into Google, the first three suggestions are “bad”, “gross” and “bad for you”. That is hardly a good view into the positives of the company, and I have seen much worst examples.

On the other hand, when you just put in “McDonalds” you get “menu”, “secret menu” and “dollar menu”. Which are much better and show that they have been able to mostly manage their reputation on the search engine. People are way more likely to see those suggestions than the first ones I cited.

If you have noticed that negative (or at least non-beneficial) search results are the first offered when you put in your brand name, you may have a problem. This can actually hurt traffic and the overall reputation of yourself or your company. That isn’t what anyone wants.

On the other hand, this information can open your eyes on some burning issues with your site usability (for example, people desperately searching [your business name + how to upgrade]).

Luckily SEOchat has an awesome tool for you to easily tap into all the Suggest results Google is showing for your brand in whatever combination: Google Suggest tool expand.

Google Suggest

The tool also supports Bing, Youtube and Amazon.

Fixing The Issue

The first thing you need to do is make sure you are not generating biased results. If you are signed into a Google account when you do the search, it is going to base things partially on any biased information you might have in past results or web browsing. Once you are signed out, or using incognito mode, you are ready to begin.

Doing the search should give you an idea of what it is you need to focus on. If you aren’t getting the direction to official sites, you should focus on spending more money for PPC in Google Adwords. If you are getting negative or insulting search suggests, you should focus on getting positive reviews and mentions on other people’s websites. Sites like BusinessProfiles.com and Cyfe may help getting additional listings.

The final influence for these suggestions are other people’s searches. But you have no real way to direct their search behavior, and trying would be pointless. Instead, focus on what you can easily control, like the three methods above.

What About Bing?

You might notice that I focused very much on Google in the information above. That is because working for the one – which is more extensive out of the two search engines – will inevitably have an effect on your results in Bing. You are basically going to need to take the same steps, so doing them for the more popular engine makes more sense.

Besides, Bing (sadly) has a long way to catch up with Google when it comes to google Suggest. Right now their results are very weak.

Have some tips on reputation management through autosuggest features on Google and Bing? Let us know in the comments.

Author information

The post Bing and Google Suggest for Personal Reputation Management appeared first on SEO Chat.

Generate the Full Indepth Article Schema.org Code Easily with Featured Tool of the Week

Last month Google official launched what they had been testing for a couple of months – the new type of search results: In-Depth articles. Those 3 “in-depth” listings appear below top nine search results and each snippet consists of the following:

  • Title tag
  • Featured image
  • Short description
  • Publisher logo and name
  • Date when it was written

Indepth articles are what Google considers evergreen content. It’s beyond competition.

Indepth articles

Currently only the select number of core powerful publishers (like nytimes.com, wsj.com, wired.com, etc) have been showing in “in-depth” block – but Google says there’s a way to be considered as “in-depth” (maybe in the future?). One of the requirements is to have some definitive types of Schema.org markup on your page.

We can’t be sure yet if Google feels like expanding in-depth articles beyond the core publishers but it never hurts getting prepared for “the better”, right? Besides, Google likes Schema.org very much, so why not take the best of it?

The Tool

With that in mind, we developed this easy, yet concise Schema.org indepth article code generator. It does both:

  • Helps you generate the required markup and easily apply it to the page.
  • Educates: Walks you through Schema.org markup showing how it works and what it takes to have it correctly set-up. The input fields are organized based on the schema type.

Indepth

We are planning to turn it into a WordPress Plugin as well, so stay tuned!

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Bulk Social Media Analyzer + Author Finder – Featured Tool of the Week

This week I am happy to feature a coolest tool in our tools column: Analyze Social Signals and Google Authorship for the List of URLs – Free Tool

It’s simple to use but has some awesome functionality: provide the list of URLs, wait a bit and enjoy:

Page-specific social media numbers:

  • Number of Facebook shares, comments and comments (as well as total) for each one
  • Number of Tweets
  • Number of Google plus ones

The tool will also find a verified author of each page and even find that author on Twitter, Facebook and Google plus. It won’t stop there and fetch social media following for each author.

Author-specific information:

  • Links to social media accounts of each author
  • Number of Twitter followers of each author
  • Number of Facebook friends of each author
  • Number Google Plus circles each author is in.

How cool is that!

Social author tool

You can also export the whole chart in a handy clickable HTML file!

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Analyze Google SERPs with Smart Page Keyword Density Tool – Featured This Week!

Today’s featured tool is a smart keyword density analysis utility that you can use to analyze SERPs (search engine results pages)!

The steps:

  • Run a search on Google and copy-paste the results URL
  • Remove s from https of the URL (to make sure the tool can access it)
  • Add &num=100 to the results to make sure the tool has a ton of text to analyze
  • Run the URL through our tool

Suddenly you have the whole list of keyword suggestions to work with:

Google SERPs analysis

Google SERPs analysis

Mind that the tool takes all on-page content and analyzes keyword co-occurrence – which means you get a good glance of your core-term keyword context.

If you scroll a bit, you’ll see further analysis of non-linked content (which in this case means analysis of meta-descriptions and parts of the text Google thought was closest-related to your search term):

Analysis of non-linked part of Google SERPs

Awesome use of an old tool. Can think of any more?

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Multi-level Google Suggest Keyword Research: Featured Tool of the Month

Last week we featured Google, Bing, Amazon, Youtube Keyword Suggest Tool that will fetch keyword suggestions for any phrase you put in and, most importantly, it will dig deeper and fetch suggestions for [your phrase + each letter of alphabet] like this:

keyword suggestion

Today’s featured tools also uses Google Suggest as data source but instead of letters, it expands each phrase to the second and third levels like this:

Google suggest - 3 levels

So meet today’s featured tool: Related keywords tool

Start with Level one to get the “core” of what you will be digging deeper to:

core phrases

List of core phrases you will be expanding

Then go to Level two to expand each phrase from the “core” list:

Google suggest results - level 2

Level 2 of keywords

Finally, switch to Level 3 to expend each and every phrase from the second level:

Google Suggest results - level 3

Level 3 of keywords

Now, feel free to download you huge list of phrases and brainstorm!

The sweet thing about that tool is that you actually see what *people tend to type*. Unless many keyword research tool (Google Adwords External being the most popular one), this output won’t be skewed towards commercial phrases. This list is exactly what people are interested in!

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Google, Bing, Amazon, Youtube Keyword Suggest Tool: Featured Tool of the Week

A couple of weeks ago we made our favorite collection of tools public at SEOchat. From now on, I am going to feature one tool a week to bring up all the glory of that section.

Today’s featured tool: Google, Bing, Amazon, Youtube Keyword Suggest Tool

The tool collects as-you-type “suggestions” you would see each time you use any of the above search engines – and to expand the list, it also tries to add each letter of the alphabet after your core keyword for you to have a huge list of phrases.

keyword suggestion

The great thing about the tool is the different nature of search engines that are included. With it, you can see:

  • General search results people tend to type in Google and Bing when starting a search with your core query
  • More commercial results they search for in Amazon
  • More entertaining results they type into Youtube search engines.

Keyword suggest results

Keeping that in mind, the Suggest tool can become a huge brainstorming help (just scrolling through results will give you lots of content ideas)! It can give you come local content ideas as well:

Local results

To navigate the results, click any letter on top of the list.

You can also select any key phrases and run “part two” of the tool that will expand those phrases for you even further:

Expand even more

You can select any phrases and get CPC and search volume for those in “Part 3″ of the tool:

cpc and search volume

Lastly, you can export your final keyword list to keep it for the reference or send to your content team.

If you notice any bugs or have any ideas on how to improve the tool, please use “Feedback” button.

Author information

Ann Smarty

Community Manager at Internet Marketing Ninjas

Ann Smarty is the pro blogger and guest blogger, social media enthusiast.

The post Google, Bing, Amazon, Youtube Keyword Suggest Tool: Featured Tool of the Week appeared first on SEO Chat.

SEO Terminology: Link Anchor Text Versus Linking to Name Anchor

The two terms sound incredibly similar, which gives the mistaken impression that they must be the same.

I see many people getting confused when you are talking about name anchors… “Is this what we need to build links for?”… Ugh, no.

The two are used for different functions entirely, and they have different tags used to make them.

Link Anchor Text

The simplest way to explain that: anchor text = visible text of the link

LinksFor example, let’s say you were speaking about Google’s search engine. In the post itself, you might mention that Google has been offering lots of cool user tools

Notice how I have anchored the link into the text speaking about Google. Clicking on that link will take you top their website. This is the same process used by people who want to connect articles together. So they would anchor a link to relevant text speaking about another post on the same blog, or page on the site.

<a href=”http://URL.com”>Anchor Text Used Here</a>

Google: Link anchor text is believed to be the most powerful SEO element. Read more about that here.

Linking to Anchor

When people adapt books, scientific studies, research papers, tutorials, or any other kind of wall-of-text style page, they will create different anchor points within it to make navigation simpler for the reader.

Name anchor allows you to point the reader to a specific part of the page…

<a name=”Section Title”></a>

Next, create the link pointing to that name anchor. This will use the standard link code, but will feature an ‘#’ before the anchor to signify that it is pointing to a section within the same page. It will look like:

<a href=”#Section Title”>Text</a>.

Google: This link may be picked up and used by Google to form the search snippet to point the user to a specific part of your web page:

Name anchor link in search results

Conclusion

Most of us have to do it on a regular basis; it’s the terminology that can be misleading!

Image Credits: 1, 2.

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Ann Smarty

Community Manager at Internet Marketing Ninjas

Ann Smarty is the pro blogger and guest blogger, social media enthusiast.

The post SEO Terminology: Link Anchor Text Versus Linking to Name Anchor appeared first on SEO Chat.

What NOT to Use Google Search For

Google Search is one of the most used tools on the internet. If you expand it to all of Google’s services, it is definitely the primary powerhouse of the web, They seem to have their hand in almost everything, and what they don’t yet control they are probably trying to find a way to. It is a company that was created to expand, and it is now a regular part of our daily lives.

But their search engine was not made for everything. There are quite a few areas where it has tried – and failed – to be the best choice.

This topic was brought up on Quora not too long ago. The top purpose voted by users of things not to use Google for was medical research information. Even Google Scholar isn’t that reliable, and they suggest Embase, Medline and Pubmed as the three primary resources for searching out medical studies. Though poster Erica Friedman points out that a comprehensive search will take quite a few more search engines.

Another answer that stood out to me was ‘people searches’. Suzanne Boland says what many of us have probably discovered: Google is useless for searching out people. You are better off doing a deep web search through a specific engine. For example, Spokeo or Pipl. These let you search by name, location, email, address, ect. They will bringWhat NOT to Use Google Search For up public information and social media profiles, respectively.

One thing I have found is terrible for finding results on Google is torrents. I don’t mean illegal ones, but those that are specifically authorized by creative content licenses. These are so difficult to find using a Google search, which gives preference to illegal download sites and trackers. Which is why I use legal torrent search engines and sites instead, which only track those that the creators have given as an open source project. You can find a list of these here.

What are some uses you think Google is useless for? Let us know in the comments!

Image Credit: 1.

Author information

Ann Smarty

Community Manager at Internet Marketing Ninjas

Ann Smarty is the pro blogger and guest blogger, social media enthusiast.

The post What NOT to Use Google Search For appeared first on SEO Chat.

Where Google+ Failed and Where It Succeeded

For years Google was trying to break into the social media scene. They spent time, energy and funds into launching their own versions, which always managed to crash and burn almost as soon as they were released.

Most of us have witnessed these failures first hand, and if you want a refresher course just check out this helpful infographic that illustrated the many attempts. Google has not had the best track record, with their successes usually through purchasing already established sites like YouTube.

I Love Google+When they launched Google+ amongst a huge amount of hype and fanfare, I am sure I was not the only one poised for disappointment. After all, we had been there before and it didn’t tend to be worth the invite to check out the new site. But they managed to get it right this time, and G+ was an immediate hit.

Even with hiccups along the way, such as with privacy issues (this is Google, after all). Now that it is available without an invite, and their services have all been linked through a single login, it has continued to grow in popularity.

So, why do so many people still claim Google+ a failure?

How Do You Solve a Problem Like Statistics?

Canned Social Networks

The biggest complaint most analysts seem to have with Google+ is the numbers. Last year, the Wall Street Journal wrote a piece claiming that the social media site had become a ‘ghost town’, despite their incredibly high user numbers. In fact, the average time spent monthly on G+ was lower than Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Twitter, LinkedIn, and even Myspace. Ouch!

For those of us who have been paying attention, these accusations are nothing new. In the past analysts have been quick to point out that most of the profiles that are on G+ seem to be inactive, or barely active. In fact, the high user rating might be blamed on the auto-creation through Google Accounts. A point backed up by this report in 2012 that showed how few shares are gathered by G+ compared to other social media sites.

The Way They Failed

Google Plus Ghosts

I think this gives a strong indication of where Google+ has missed the mark. They never became a social network, and perhaps they didn’t mean to be. It is more a slightly socialized element to a wide array of services. But like so many of their other products, it isn’t actually aimed for the average user. In fact, it is rather inaccessible to the average social user, thanks to a unique but complicated platform design that most just don’t seem to gel with.

That gap is useability is so wide that the Huffington Post last year found that one in three of Google’s employees were inactive on the site. When even the people who work for you aren’t using our product, it is a bad sign.

The Way They Succeeded

Google+ Latte

After saying all of that, I am not suggesting that Google has actually failed. On the contrary, I think they have made some incredible progress in creating a unique kind of social network. One that is aimed more at the computer and technology enthusiasts and industry leaders than the average Joe. There is also a distinct edge for business use, and with Google Authorship they have made it a must have for the average blogger, as well.

For the first time, Google seems to be playing to their strengths rather than trying to take a bite out of Facebook. They are becoming more established within this niche, and they are surging in popularity as a result. We now include G+ automatically when we name off the major social media sites on the web, which we never would have done before with some of their other attempts.

Conclusion

Has Google+ failed? I suppose it depends on what they were trying to achieve in the first place. If they wanted an open, accessible social platform for all users on the web, then yes, they probably failed.

But if they were trying to make a business, blog and tech geek friendly version of other sites with a unique format, then they succeeded beyond anyone’s hopes. The numbers they provide are still pretty shady, and I don’t think anyone believes them when they talk about their active user base. But I am personally willing to forgive them for their fibs. As long as they never try to bring back Buzz.

Image Credits: 1, 2, 3, 4.

Author information

Ann Smarty

Community Manager at Internet Marketing Ninjas

Ann Smarty is the pro blogger and guest blogger, social media enthusiast.

The post Where Google+ Failed and Where It Succeeded appeared first on SEO Chat.